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The Tibetan Terrier



The Tibetan Terrier
The Tibetan Terrier is double-coated. If your dog is combed once a week or every ten days or so, mats should not form. Mats are to be avoided – a matted Tibetan Terrier is a neglected Tibetan Terrier.

The coat has a way of casting off dirt, so frequent bathing is not required, especially considering that Tibetan Terriers are absolutely without odor. The only clipping required on a Tibetan Terrier is of the toenails. The hairs in the ears should be watched, and removed periodically, so that not too much accumulates, causing wax to pile up, with possible ear trouble.

A Tibetan Terrier tries hard to please, so the last thing anyone should think of doing is to hit them for any reason. All that is needed is to be “asked” to do what is required and the request will be met. They do have ideas of their own at times, such as not coming when called while puppies, but as they grow older they become more obedient.

Tibetan Terriers should be under control at all times. They should be exercised either in a fenced yard or on a lead. The rest of the time, they like to be near their family and are content to lie on the floor at their owner’s feet. They are wonderful little travelers and sit quietly in a car or curl up and go to sleep on the seat.

They are exceptionally hardy, and are free of many diseases and ailments common to many other breeds.

The Tibetan Terrier - often called the Holy Dog of Tibet - has evolved over hundreds of years of harsh conditions, tempered by the warmth and care of monks high in the Himalayas.

The little people, as they were called, were highly valued as companions to the monks and families who owned them. They were treated like children in the family. Like the children, they eagerly assisted in taking care of the monastery’s or family’s property, their flocks and herds.

Sure footed and reliable, they were sometimes sent to accompany a particularly esteemed traveler on a treacherous mountain journey home.

No Tibetan in old Tibet who was fortunate enough to own a Tibetan Terrier would ever sell their dog. The dogs were considered good luck, and no one in their right mind would “sell” part of their luck. Mistreating or mismating a Tibetan Terrier could bring bad luck to the family and even the village.

While they were not sold, they were given as gifts, perhaps in appreciation of a highly valued deed. The first Tibetan Terrier to come to Europe came with an English doctor who was given a dog in return for saving someone’s life.

The Tibetan Terrier who has emerged from this special environment is a healthy, bouncy, well-proportioned breed with a gentle, fun temperament. He is highly intelligent, sensitive, and devoted.

He is not a hunter, he may or may not be a herder. He is, above all, a companion. As a member of the family, he has few equals - constantly cheerful, wonderful with children, warm and affectionate. He is genuinely interested in your daily goings-on, will involve himself in your life and will soon take a position as a cherished member of your family.

If you would like a companion who can think for himself or herself, “laugh” at you when you are wrong and make you laugh when you are sad - one that is beautiful to look at and has a very special history - come and meet a Tibetan Terrier.

But be warned. You may never be free of their spell.


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